Getting To Know & Getting Rid of Invasive Plants

Invasive Plants - Dandelions

Invasive plants are just as they sound; invasive. They are invading a space that is not native to them. This doesn’t just mean they came from somewhere other than your geographic locale, it can mean that they will cause big trouble for your landscape. Not all invasive plants are bad, but knowing how to identify them and remove them if needed can be mission-critical to keeping your lawn and its surrounding landscapes healthy.

Spring-Green, the neighborhood lawn care specialists for over forty years, can guide you to the knowledge you need to protect your landscape against potential damage that invasive species can cause. Of course, we’re here for you every step of the way as you build the perfect and healthy outdoor oasis. So, let’s drill down on the definitions, signs, and best practices for dealing with invasive plants.

Test Your Invasive Plant Knowledge

  • The Definition – The official definition, as put out by the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration, for invasive plants is any organism that causes ecological or economic harm in a new environment in a region where it is not considered native. Invasive plants can range from fish to reptiles to (the focus of this guide) plants. Invasive plants can be introduced to an area by ship ballast water or accidental release. The most common way, however, is attributed to human transport.
  • Common Invasive Plants ­– Your region will determine which invasive plant species you should be on the lookout for, but it’s a good idea to get familiar with this list of common ones.
    •  Poison Ivy – Poison Ivy is known for the itchy rash it causes for most people and is definitely an invasive plant species that you’ll want to keep out of your garden. If you spot it, be sure to wear gloves and protective clothing when removing it from your yard.
    • Dandelions – Dandelion can be problematic because it can quickly take over your entire lawn. The commonly-recognized yellow flower blooms quickly, and its seeds can disperse in the wind. Next thing you know, your green lawn is overtaken by a field of yellow flowers.
    • Violets – Wild violets are hearty in most environments as well as add flair and color to your garden. If you don’t want them in your garden, however, you can remove by hand or with a spot spray weed killer.
    • Creeping Charlie – Creeping Charlie is also sometimes referred to as Ground Ivy. It is strong and vigorous and can overtake your garden creating a mat that smothers other plants. You can dig it up or treat it with herbicide, which will likely take several applications over several weeks.
    • Plantain – Plantain is a common garden weed that likes the dark, moist corners or your garden. It’s easy to get rid of by digging up the roots or with the use of a Dandelion weeder. 
    • Crabgrass – Crabgrass is easy to remove by hand, but if it’s not kept under control, it can become a full-time job to get rid of it. Crabgrass thrives in the heat of summer and can be kept at bay with spot herbicide applications.

Crab Grass is also Invasive Plants

The Problems They Cause – The issue with invasive plants can be large on a macro and micro level. Let’s explore some of those reasons why we shouldn’t let invasive plants into our landscape and some of the problems they can cause.

  • Economic impact – Beyond our own backyards, invasive species can have a deep impact on the economies they invade. Agriculture, forestry, and fishing can all be impacted when invasive species are left uncontrolled.
  • Environmental impact – Invasive species have been shown to have an extreme impact on the environments they enter. They can cause the extinction of native plants and animals, destroy the surrounding biodiversity and permanently alter natural habitats.
  • Impact on Your Garden – Not all invasive species are bad, but most can have a negative impact on your home or business landscape. With their survival resilience, they can overtake your native plants, trees, and grasses if not kept in check.

How to get rid of invasive plants – Getting rid of the invasive plants that have popped up in your garden is not rocket science, but it might require some hard work. Techniques will slightly vary depending on the type of invasive plant you’re faced with removing, but the following are some overarching ways to clear them out.

  • Pull them out at the roots manually. Pull them out by the roots and dispose of your invasive species, if you can. If they have overcome your garden, this might be a tall task – so start early.
  • Use garden machinery. Mowing, chainsaws, and weed whippers might all be useful in getting the invasive species out quicker. It can be hard to protect to your desired native plants, grasses, and shrubbery.
  • Apply herbicides or weed killers. Your local garden center will have a bevy of chemical applications to kill off your invasive plants. The key will be finding ones that are environmentally-friendly and applying a way to does not kill everything.
  • Hire a professional for the assist. Spring-Green professionals help homeowners every day find solutions to protect their gardens from invasive species as well as assistance with removing them if they get out of control.

Spring-Green is your neighborhood lawn care specialist. We’ve been helping local homeowners and businesses with all aspects of lawn care since 1977. The impact of invasive species can be unsightly, costly, and negatively impact our environment. Spring-Green can help you proactively avoid issues before they happen and get your garden out of trouble if invasive plant species find a stronghold there. It all starts with a phone call or an email.

Start your partnership with the professional lawn care team at Spring Green today.

Everything to Know About Thatch

thatch

Lawn thatch is a term you may have heard thrown around, or maybe you’ve even seen it up close a few times, but how much do you truly know about it? The lawn care pros at Spring-Green have compiled a guide to help you get schooled up on thatch. Everything you need to know has been gathered up in this easy-to-read format so you can get your overview quickly and then return to your busy life. Of course, we’re here for you to help you with any and all your lawn care needs related to thatch or otherwise.

Lawn Thatch 101

So, What Exactly Is Thatch? Thatch is a mix of dead and living plant matter that typically forms at the base of your grass, right at the point where the grass stems meet the soil. Some popular types of grasses are more likely to experience thatch buildup than others. It’s common for grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, Bermudagrass, and creeping fescues to get thick thatch that requires dethatching. On the other hand, tall fescue or perennial ryegrass rarely have thatch problems.

What Causes Thatch? Normally, organic matter, such as small grass clippings or mulched leaves, breaks down quickly. However, sometimes these materials and others can go too slowly, causing a buildup layer that leads to thatch growth.

Should I Be Worried If I See Thatch in My Lawn? A common question homeowners have is whether thatch is good or bad for their grass or plants. The answer is – it depends. If the thatch layers grow beyond one inch of thickness, they become barriers to the health of your lawn and plant life. Thick thatch can block the needed water and fertilizer from reaching grass roots leaving your lawn and plants vulnerable to heat and stress. As you continue to water your thatch covered lawn, the irrigation can trap moisture, creating a breeding ground for disease and insects.

How Do I Get Rid of Thatch? If your lawn’s thatch has grown to over two inches of thickness, you may call in the professionals to get rid of it. Excessive thatch removal has to be done gently to avoid damage the roots of your grass. If your thatch has not gotten overly thick, you may be able to take care of it yourself.  You can dethatch your lawn in three ways:

  1. Dethatching Rakes – Manual dethatching rakes are one option to get rid of the thatch in your lawn. These special rakes have curved blades that can be used to dig into your lawn and pull up thatch. These are good for small dethatching areas and for general maintenance of small areas.
  • Power Rakes – A power rake is another option if you have a larger area to dethatch. Power rakes are similar to a push mower but have rotating devices that pull out the thatch. Power rakes are a good choice for lawns with thinner thatch layers and tough grass that can take the powerful removal of thatch.
  • Vertical Mowers – Verticutters, also referred to as a vertical mower, are a third option in the DIY thatch removal effort. They have vertical blades sharp enough to dig down through the thatch layer to pull out the thatch forcefully. The downside is they often pull out the grass as well. Verticutters are a good option if you are completely overhauling your lawn.
thatch raking

Can I Prevent Thatch from Popping Up? While there is no fool-proof way to prevent thatch from occurring, there are a few steps to take to prevent it.

  • Keeping an eye on your lawn’s soil pH balance, for example. Lawns with low soil pH are more prone to thatch.
  • Another common factor to thatch overgrowth is too much fertilizer or using products with too much pesticide.
  • One final tip is to monitor the thatch growth and deal with it at its beginning stages. If left too long, the thatch becomes harder to remove and the damage to the grass becomes more significant.

Are There Special Steps I Should Take After I Dethatch? When you finish your dethatching work, be sure to rake up all thatch debris and water your dethatched lawn thoroughly. This is also an ideal time to seed your lawn, now that you’ve cleared the space for new, healthy growth. As a preventative maintenance step, you can also start to test your soil to ensure its pH is at optimal levels.

Spring-Green, the lawn care leader since 1977, can help you determine the why, when and how around dethatching your lawn. We’ll help you get your lawn back on track and then provide the guidance to keep it there.  Count on our team of pros to help you enjoy a beautiful, healthy lawn – thatch-free.

Get in touch with a Spring-Green pro today.

The Luck of the Irish? All About Clover in Your Lawn

clover

St. Patrick’s Day is upon us! It’s the time where Irish heritage is the way to be, and symbols like four-leaf clovers and rainbows (with pots o’gold at the end) are in fashion, and, don’t get us started on green beer! But for many homeowners, finding clovers in the lawn can leave them confused at best and frustrated at worst. As we embark on the most-Irish of holidays, let’s unpack the truth about the clover and its effect on your lawn. Is it a lucky find in your yard, or an intruder that must go?

Clover Basics

Why are Clovers Symbolic of St. Patrick’s Day? – The Shamrock can be translated from Gaelic to “little clover.” It has three leaves that, as lore states, St. Patrick used to explain the Holy Trinity, as well as faith, hope, and love. The four-leafed clover became known as lucky simply because they are rare.

What’s the Most Common Type of Clover? – White Dutch is the most commonly found clover in lawns. Clover is of the genus Trifolium, which has about 300 species of flowering plants in the legume or pea family.

Why is Clover in My Lawn? – There are a variety of reasons that you might have the luck of finding clovers in your lawn, including:

  • Imbalance in the soil’s pH
  • Nutrient deficiencies, especially nitrogen
  • Grass that has been cut too short
  • Poorly watered grass
  • Compacted soil due to organic matter

How Do I Get Rid of Clover? – The way to control clover growth in the lawn is to mow and water regularly, as well as apply fertilizers that combat the growth of clovers.

The Cons of Clover

  • Messy Clover is more staining than grass. For those who have kids playing in the lawn, this could be a consideration. Plus, not everyone enjoys the look of clover in their regular turf grass.
  • Not good for High Traffic Areas Clovers are less durable than grass. Clover must be mixed with grass to be strong enough for playing fields or high traffic areas.
  • May Require Reseeding Reseeding every four to five years may be required to maintain an even clover cover in your lawn, unless it’s mixed with grass.

The Pros of Clover

There are, however, some reasons why you may consider keeping and controlling clover in your lawn, rather than eliminating it altogether.

  • Attracts & Supports Bees Clovers are an important nectar source for insects that pollinate, including bees. The global bee population is decreasing at an alarming rate, and any support of the ecosystem that helps them thrive, which can have an extremely important impact on our shared environment.
  • Good for Soil Clover can add significant improvements to the fertility and health of your lawn’s soil. Clovers act as a natural fertilizing agent by transferring nitrogen compounds from the atmosphere into the soil.

If you need help with your lawn care and controlling where clover may be popping up, Spring-Green is standing by to help. Our services include fertilization, irrigation, lawn care and maintenance, weed control, and more. Our services include fertilization and weed control programs, tree and shrub care programs, core aeration and more. Contact Spring-Green today.

Stay Sharp: How To Keep Your Lawn Mower Blade Working Its Best

lawn mower
Have you ever pondered the sharpness of your lawn mower? If so, you are not alone in your consideration of the sharpness of your mower. You can follow all the mowing tips and mowing best practices available for consumption, but with a dull blade, you won’t get too far. The pros at Spring-Green, your neighborhood lawn care professionals, are here with the tips you need to keep your mower blade sharp and your lawn looking sharp!

Guide To Keeping Your Lawn Mower Blades Sharp

Does a sharp mower blade really matter?

Compare the sharpness of your lawn mower blade to your razor. Your goals of a clean-shaven face would fall flat without a sharp blade, wouldn’t they? An old or dull lawn mower blade can leave your lawn looking less than amazing as well as cause damage to your grass.

If your lawn mower blades are dull and/or damaged, it can actually create long-term issues with your lawn. The dull cut can leave a torn grass blade becomes distressed and more susceptible to pests and diseases. As we work so hard to keep our lawn looking great all summer, the state of our lawn mower can actually undo all that hard work if not maintained properly.

How do I sharpen my mower blade?

Lawn mowers have a few options to sharpen lawn mower blades, ranging from a bench grinder, hand file, rotary tool or angle grinder. Your lawn mower blades can also be sharpened with a drill and sharpening stone designed for sharpening dull lawn mower blades. While every lawn mower make and model is unique, here are some guidelines to removing the blades before sharpening:

  • Some mowers allow you to sharpen the blades without removing them, which saves a lot of time.
  • Taking the blade off, however, does allow you to do a more thorough job and avoid damaging any other part of the mower.
  • Take safety precautions like disconnecting your lawn mower’s ignition wire from the spark plug or removing the battery pack before getting started. Also, drain the gas tank, so there is no chance of a fuel spill while you are sharpening the mower blades.
  • Once you have the mower blades removed, take advantage of this opportunity to clean your mower scraping away any debris that’s hard to reach when the mower is intact.
  • Once you’ve sharpened the mower’s blades, be sure to the blade using a lawn mower blade balancer. This step is important as a lawn mower blade that is out of balances can damage the motor and stress the mower.

How often should mower blades be sharpened?

A commonly-asked question is how often, “Should I sharpen my mower blades?” The answer is it depends. Factors such as the type of mower you use, the age of that mower and the condition of your mower can impact the frequency. Your sharpening frequency will also be impacted by how often you mow and how large the space you are mowing is.

A good rule of thumb would be to sharpen if you notice the grass is not cleanly cut or is uneven. Another good frame of reference is to sharpen your mower after every 20 to 25 hours of use. This could be once a year for small, personal mowers or once a quarter for those who mow large areas more frequently.

How much should I expect to spend on sharpening my mower blades?

Some good news…it doesn’t cost a lot of money to keep your mower blades sharp! If you are a do-it-yourself type, you need to invest in the cost of the sharpener or drill bit which will typically be in the ballpark of $20. Of course, you may have to factor in the value of your time, if you want to get an accurate cost.

If you choose to have a local garden shop do it for you, it will cost a bit more (most likely) but will save you time. For those of you doing the math, if you pay someone to sharpen your blade twice during the lawn mowing season, you’ll likely pay enough to cover the cost of the sharpening tool that you could use to do it yourself for years to come.

A routine check of your lawn mower’s blades is essential to keeping your lawn looking good, feeling healthy and keeping your lawn mower working at optimal levels. Sharpening your lawn mower blades is easy to do yourself or have a local professional assist you.

The professionals at Spring-Green are here to provide you tips for proper lawn mowing. Being locally owned and operated, Spring-Green is able to truly understand the lawn care needs of your area so we can create the best value and most personalized yard care programs for you!

Contact your neighborhood Spring-Green lawn care professional today.

Seedheads Developing on Cool Season Grasses

Some customers get worried when they see little seedheads covering their lawns, usually starting around the middle of May when sunlight reaches 12 hours a day. It is a natural process of the grass to produce seed, and fertilizing and proper mowing practices will help keep the lawn healthy.

The seedheads are forming on tiny stalks that the grass plant sends up. Depending on its abundance, the seedheads can make the lawn look pale. Once the stalks are mowed, which don’t cut as easily as grass blades, they may shred and give the lawn an almost white appearance.

Seedhead development usually occurs on cool season grasses such as Perennial Ryegrass, Kentucky Bluegrass and Tall Fescue during this time of year. Annual bluegrass (Poa Annua) produce seedheads earlier in the spring and sometimes in the fall.

seedheads

Tips For Lawns Forming Seedheads

Continue mowing at 2½ to 3 inches, but you may have to mow more often. Be sure to keep a sharp mower blade and mow high. It is not recommended to mow short or lower the mower blade to remove or reduce seedheads. It takes extra energy to produce them so your lawn may look a little pale for a couple of weeks, but it will recover. The old seed stalks will break off and will decompose into the lawn.

Unless the seedheads can ripen for about 4 months, the seed will not germinate in the lawn or, if you compost your clippings, in your compost pile. Be sure to continue your fertilization program and provide an inch of water per week as we move into the warm summer months.

Keep in mind that seedhead development is a natural process, but with proper lawn care practices you can minimize their impact. If you have any questions, contact your local neighborhood lawn care professional at Spring-Green.

Are Spring-Green Lawn Care Services Safe for Pets?

pets lawn care safety

A general concern that comes up every year is if the pesticides we use are safe for pets and children. The majority of the pesticide products Spring-Green uses are considered “General Use” and can be purchased and used by homeowners.

Spring-Green will post every treated lawn and leave instructions to stay off the lawn until the application has dried. While the drying time is influenced by weather, in most cases, keeping pets and children off the treated area for 2 hours after the application is a good practice and recommended. After the drying time, your pets and kids can enjoy the yard!

Always check the invoice left at the time of the application for any other specific information.

Protecting Pollinators

We appreciate your concern for bees and that dandelions are a food source of bees. For the majority of lawns that we service, dandelions or other flowering weeds that may be food for bees, are usually not found in large numbers. For those that are present, we will apply a weed control application on a spot treatment basis.

A great way to support pollinators is by adding diverse flowering plants in your yard that bloom from early spring to late fall. You can also make your own hummingbird nectar by mixing 1 part sugar with 4 parts water, and bring to a boil to kill any bacteria or mold present.

There are a certain number of lawns that do have an extensive weed problem when they begin our service and this situation requires that the entire lawn to be treated. There are an abundance of flowering weeds in parks, vacant lots, commercial sites and residential lawns that provide food for bees and other pollinators.

The weed control products that we use are labelled for residential use by the US EPA and we adhere to those label directions. When properly applied by licensed and trained applicators, they pose no unreasonable risk to the environment.

Spring-Green Lawn Care Has Over 40 Years of Experience

Spring-Green has over 40 years of experience in applying pesticides. We require appropriate protective equipment when making applications to lawns and/or landscapes and all our Field Service Professionals are trained and appropriately licensed to apply these pesticides.

Each pesticide we use is registered for use on residential properties by the Environmental Protection Agency. The registration process can take up to 10 years to complete and may cost $100 million or more before it is available for residential use. Additionally, each pesticide must be reviewed once every 15 years. The EPA considers the effects these products have on pets, humans and the environment during the initial registration process and during each review process.

In summary, the products that Spring-Green uses are registered for use on residential properties as determined by the US EPA and when applied based on label requirements by a licensed and trained applicator, pose no unreasonable risk to humans, pets or to the environment. Spring-Green offers the highest quality service in an environmentally responsible manner. Spring-Green also offers an Organic-Based Fertilizer program that introduces organic materials into your soil.

If you have any additional questions, contact your local neighborhood lawn care professional at Spring-Green or submit your question to our lawn care expert on the left side bar.

Happy National Lawn Care Month – We’ve Got All The Tips!

national lawn care month

It’s April. It’s spring. The temps are rising, the birds are chirping and it’s National Lawn Care Month! At Spring-Green, we love April for all these reasons, and we want to spread our love of the lawn with you with some fun facts and interesting tips to celebrate.

In Honor of National Lawn Care Month: 3 Ways Our Lawns Make Our Lives Better

1. They protect us from ticks, mosquitoes, fleas and fire ants. A lawn treated with safe and environmentally-friendly pest control products will protect your family’s health. If left untreated, we could be exposed to the diseases and discomfort that these pests can cause, such as:

  • Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other diseases can be transmitted via tick bites.
  • West Nile Virus, Encephalitis, Chikungunya and the Zika virus are all linked to mosquito bites from infected mosquitoes.
  • Anemia-causing tapeworms, as well as murine typhus, have been traced to flea bites.
  • Life-threatening allergic reactions, more than just a painful nuisance, are linked to fire ant bites.

2. They make us happier. Our lives are enriched by having green spaces around us, and the science backs up this assertion. In fact, a study put out by Housley and Wolf showed that just by looking (even through a window) out at plants, trees and green lawn, we can reduce our stress levels and lower our blood pressure – not to mention the endless hours of fun the kids have playing tag on hot summer evenings! A green environment has also been shown to improve focus and memory. Greener neighborhoods also tend to have lower crime rates. Coincidence, we think not.

3. They make us healthier. Keeping your lawn properly mowed can keep us healthier by reducing the effects of seasonal allergies. The pollen in grasses is produced at the tips of the top of the blades. By keeping your lawn maintained at a height of about two inches, you’ll help the allergy sufferers in your family avoid the pollen that makes them miserable. Just a few of many reasons, we celebrate National Lawn Care Month.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Lawn Care This National Lawn Care Month (And All Year Long):

Do mow often, but don’t mow too short.
Do use fertilizer to control weeds, but don’t use harsh chemicals.
Do stick to a watering schedule. Don’t overwater.
Do cut your lawn at the right time of day, but don’t cut it if it’s wet.
Do adjust your lawn care plans based on the season. Don’t forget about clearing away debris, leaves and branches regularly.
Do learn what things make sense for you to do yourself. Don’t hesitate to bring in an experienced lawn care professional to help you with your lawn care.

While National Lawn Care Month is top of mind in April of every year, it’s top of our minds here at Spring-Green all year long. We understand just how important, and sometimes challenging, it can be to have and maintain a lawn care regimen. That’s why we’re here.

In fact, for over 20 years, we’ve been perfecting ways to help home and business owners enjoy beautiful lawns with no stress and no worry about what to do and what not to do. Our experienced professionals are up-to-date on the latest lawn care techniques, dedicated to providing the very best in customer service and standing by to meet your needs.

Contact your Spring-Green lawn professional today!

Answers to Top Frequently Asked Questions about Warm Season Grass Mowing

warm season grass lousiana

If you’re like most homeowners, you have a few pressing questions about warm season grasses that need to be answered ASAP! Before we dive into the most commonly asked questions about your dormant grass and its best care recommendations, let’s get on the same page.

First-things-first, let’s make sure we understand what warm season grasses are. Warm season grasses, as the name implies, thrive in temperatures that are consistently over 75 degrees.

These warm-weather loving grasses are best used in warm regions such as the south, southeast, and southwest of the United States, where summers last longer, and average temperatures are higher. Now that we’ve got our definitions cleared up, let’s explore the most commonly asked questions about warm season grass and its care during winter and beyond.

Answers To Your FAQs About Your Warm Season Grass

1. What happens when my warm season grass goes dormant? When the temperatures begin to dip, warm season grasses become dormant. They change from green to brown, but this does not mean they have died. They are simply in their dormant state to ride out the cold seasons. Once temperatures rise above 75 in the spring, they will turn green again. If you live in an area that experiences extreme temperatures in the summer, you may notice a dormancy period during the hottest and driest parts of your summer as well.

2. When should I stop mowing my lawn before winter? The answer, well it depends. First, you have to define what frost zone you live in. (Hint – the Farmer’s Almanac can help with that.) Once determined, mow your warm season grass two or three times before the first frost arrives. Be sure to slowly reduce the blade’s height each time you mow before it gets too cold.

3. What are the common types of warm season grass? Another common warm season grass question goes something like this: Is Bermuda a warm season grass? How do I know if my grass is the kind that goes dormant during winter? Is Zoysia grass a warm season grass? To answer these pressing questions, the most common types of warm season grass include Bermudagrass, Bahia Grass, Centipede Grass, St. Augustine Grass and Zoysia Grass.

4. Should I mow dormant grass? In most cases, it is not necessary to mow dormant warm-season grasses. The exception to this recommendation is when the grass was left too long the previous fall. In this case, mowing the grass shorter in the spring is a recommended practice.

Proper mowing is the key to successful warm season grass and the overall health of your lawn. The guideline for mowing your winter season grass vary based on the type of grass you have, but three best practices hold true for all.

Tips for winter season grass mowing:

• Bag up the trash! Dispose of clippings to reduce thatch buildup in warm season lawns.
• Use a sharp blade! By using a sharp mower blade, your mowing will put less stress on the grass as well as help to prevent fungus.
• Never go too short! Don’t remove more than one-third of your warm season grass’s height in one mowing.

Height guidelines for your warm season grass:

• Bermudagrass – 3/4″ – 1 1/2″ inches
• St. Augustine Grass – 1 1/2″ – 3″ inches
• Centipede Grass – 1″ – 2″ inches
• Zoysia Grass – 3/4″ – 2 1/2″

5. How best should I wake up dormant grass? There is a chance that your warm season grass is not simply dormant. It could be dead. It’s hard to tell what the answer is until you begin to reverse the condition which is done by watering and as temperatures begin to warm up. By watering your warm season grass regularly, you should revive it from its dormant state in a matter of a few days. An important note – while you are in the process of watering your lawn to “wake it up,” try to limit foot traffic that can damage the root system. Also, refrain from mowing during this time period.

6. When will my grass go dormant? Warm season grass thrives in temps above 75 degrees Fahrenheit. When soil temperatures dip below 55 degrees, your grass will enter its dormant state. When this happens will vary based on where you live, and the weather patterns your region faces during any particular fall or winter season.

Now that we’ve gotten this pressing questions out of the way, it’s time to get out there and care for our lawns…well, if it’s time, that is! At Spring-Green, we’ve been helping homeowners and businesses maintain beautiful lawns and landscapes all year long for 40 years.

As your neighborhood lawn care professional, we will treat your lawn like it’s our own. When it’s time to wake up that dormant warm weather grass, you can count on our professional team of lawn care technicians for even the toughest challenge.

Contact your nearest neighborhood Spring-Green lawn care professional today.

The Secrets To Winter Lawn Care Revealed

winter lawn care

Professional landscaping experts get the frequently asked winter lawn care questions over and over again. “How often should I water my lawn in winter?” Or other varieties like:

  • How can I keep my lawn healthy during the cold months, so it looks great in spring and summer?
  • What are the best tools to prep my lawn before the first snowfall comes?
  • I have this type of grass, how do I care for it during winter?

So, since those are just a few of the commonly asked questions about winter lawn care, we decided we should put together an easy to follow guide to help our customers who are faced with these conundrums every year when the seasons change. We hope these tips address your questions and sets your lawn up for success all year long!

The Secret To Great Winter Lawn Care

1. Like most things in life, preparation is key. It comes like clockwork every year. Sometime after Halloween, we start to feel a chill in the air. By Christmas, we are in the full throes of the winter season – like it or not. By planning out your winter lawn care before winter is in full force, you’re much more likely to keep your lawn healthy throughout the year.

Here’s what should be on your calendar for your lawn’s best care:

  • Fertilize – Apply fertilizer to your grass and landscaping plants in late fall before the harshness of winter kicks off. Your lawn care professional can help you determine the right timing and which products are best for your home.
  • Clean – Your winter lawn care regiment should include clearing the way for the sun. Clean the leaves and debris throughout the cold season to allow for sunlight and avoid mold which can lead to disease.
  • Mow – Just before the first freeze occurs, mow your lawn shorter than you normally would by lowering the height of your mower. Take care not to cut it too short as that will also cause damage.

2. Know what to do when bad weather is on its way. Winter weather can pop up without warning, but usually, we do have some notice when a snowstorm is headed our direction. If you know a winter storm or deep freeze is approaching, be sure to take a few precautionary steps.

  • Watch for snow mold. To prevent snow mold, make sure to de-thatch or aerate your lawn regularly, which will increase air circulation and prevent snow mold.
  • Avoid voles. Voles occur when small rodents leave tunnels in the snow and lawn debris and eat your plant roots. Vole trails can be prevented by removing lawn debris continuously throughout the winter months.

3. Understand your lawn’s watering needs. The answer to how often to water your winter lawn will likely come down to the region of the country you live in and what type of grass you have growing in your lawn. For example, a homeowner with Bermuda grass can hold off for several months without watering.

It may not look pretty, but it will survive. On the other hand, Tall Fescue, a cool-season grass, can survive for about 30 days with only one inch of water. In general terms, a healthy lawn will need about one inch of water per week, with less water needed during the winter than the summer.

No matter the season, Spring-Green lawn care can help you care for your lawn and prepare for anything Mother Nature serves up! Our team of lawn care professionals offers expertise the needs of your area and with limitless types of landscapes. Since 1977, we’ve been providing a full range of professional lawn care services to fit any budget.

For more information on caring for your winter lawn or any of your landscaping needs, contact your neighborhood lawn care professional today at Spring-Green.

Has Spring Finally Sprung? Tips For Your Lawn This Spring Season!

spring season lawn tips

Spring has taken its sweet time to arrive for most of the U.S. If you live in the more northern states like Minnesota, Wisconsin or Michigan, you may be thinking that spring may never arrive since these areas still have snow. Receiving some snow at this time of year is not uncommon for these folks.

Even the lawns in the warmer parts of the U.S. are greening up at a much slower rate than normal. Warm season turfgrasses such as Bermuda or Zoysia, often turn brown during the winter months and don’t begin to start growing until temperatures are consistently above 70 degrees. There have been warm days, but not enough in a row to get these grasses to start growing again.

Tips to Prepare Your Lawn For Spring

Except for the lawns in the great white north, there are still plenty of things that you can do for your lawn and landscape to get a jump start on the year. The first thing to do is to take a walk around your lawn and look for any areas where the grass may be matted down.

This can be the result of foot traffic across the lawn, excessive levels of snow or even some snow mold that may have developed in the late winter of early spring. For the most part, lightly raking the area to fluff up the grass is all that is necessary. Be sure to wait until the lawn has dried out some before raking. Raking wet turf could result in pulling out the new growth.

You can also check your lawn mower, power equipment, and gardening tools in case they need to be repaired or replaced.

Should I Core Aerate My Lawn This Spring?

Core aerating your lawn in the spring is a good thing to do, but the timing is important. For warm season areas, it is best to wait until the turf has begun to turn green. The roots grow best when temperatures are between 80˚ to 95˚ F. The roots of warm season grasses are growing the most in the spring when soil temperatures are between 75˚ to 85˚ F.

For cool season grasses, such as Perennial Ryegrass and Bluegrass, roots grow the best when temperatures are between 60 to 75˚ F and roots grow best when soil temperatures are between 50 to 65˚ F. Core aeration for cool season grasses can be performed on the lawn now, but it is best to wait a couple more weeks before aerating warm season grasses.

Most lawns don’t need to be seeded in the spring. Even a thinning lawn will improve dramatically over the next couple of months. Also, if a lawn is seeded in the spring, it will be difficult if not impossible to control annual grassy weeds like crabgrass or to control germinating broadleaf weeds like dandelions.

Spring fertilization is also important to get your lawn off to a good start and “wake up” from dormancy. Contact your local neighborhood lawn care professional at Spring-Green to schedule your important spring fertilization treatment for a green, healthy turf this season.  Be sure to learn more about our additional services, such as core aeration, that we have to offer to help you enjoy your lawn and landscape this spring!