Weed And Feed 101 – Everything You’ve Always Wanted To Know

weed and feed

Like many things in life timing matters. If you want a healthy, vibrant lawn year-round, it’s just as important to understand what it needs as well as to understand when it needs it. A foundational link to your lawn’s health is providing protection from the weeds that can threaten its very existence. Weed killers, weed and feed and the timing of it all, however, can be mystifying to homeowners seeking answers.

Not to worry though, you’ve got a neighborhood lawn expert at your disposal! Spring-Green has the basics of weed killer best practices, timing recommendations and more. Before you go out to administer any weed and feed, check out this primer on the when, what, where, how and why…well, we know the why, right?

Common Weed And Feed Questions Deboned

What is weed and feed? Weed and feed is an interchangeable, universal name given to a wide variety of lawn chemicals that have the purpose of strengthening the lawn by killing weeds. It generally improves your lawn’s ability to absorb water and food and adds necessary nutrients which promote healthy growth.

A healthy lawn, in turn, discourages weed propagation, enabling the use of a reduced amount of the product over time. There are many types of weed and feed that we will drill down on for further learnings.

What is the “weed” in my weed and feed? The weed component is comprised of herbicides (typically Dicamba, 2, 4-D and/or MCPP). These chemicals are designed to squelch dandelions, dollarweed and the most common green leafy weeds.

What makes up the “feed” in my weed and feed? The “feed” is a fertilizer. Typically, it is a combo of nitrogen, phosphorous and/or potassium. The blends vary, but all are designed to help your lawn flourish.

How does weed and feed work? Granules are applied to and absorbed by the leaves of the weed but doesn’t kill regular grass (unless too much is applied). In addition to the granular form, liquid forms are available that can be applied with a sprayer.

What is pre-emergent weed and feed? Pre-emergent weed and feed, as the name implies, targets weeds before they appear. Pre-emergent weed and feed does not control existing weeds. Annual applications over the target area for best results. Water in your pre-emergent weed and feed to activate the herbicide and create a barrier against weeds before they grow.

What is post-emergent weed and feed? Post-emergent weed and feed is the most common form for ridding weeds from lawns. When you already have weeds, the post-emergent weed and feed varietal is in order. Using a mixture of chemicals, they kill the weed and keep it from growing back.

How do seasons impact my weed and feed strategy? To be effective with your weed and feed strategy, you need to get the timing right. As a rule of thumb, time the application of weed and feed with the fertilization of the lawn during the last week of March or early April.

Keeping weeds out of your lawn can often be a chronic struggle that requires a strategy that is comprehensive and continuous. Understanding when to use pre-emergent weed and feed versus post-emergent as well as getting the timing right can be the winning combination to help you reach the finish line.

Whether it’s weeds or routine upkeep you’re in need of, Spring-Green is America’s go-to for neighborhood lawns and landscapes care since 1977. We are locally owned and operated and take our commitment to our community seriously.

Contact your nearest neighborhood Spring-Green lawn care professional today.

Winter Weed Control On Warm-Season Grasses

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This picture is a Bermuda grass lawn in Opelika, AL entering dormancy. Each year, as the temperatures drop, this is what happens to most warm season grasses when exposed to freezing temperatures. They take on this almost camouflage-look to them.

Except for parts of Florida, most warm season grasses enter into a dormant state during the winter. They will turn brown and do not green-up until next spring through early summer. Even though the grass turns brown, there are still broadleaf weeds and annual grasses that continue growing throughout the winter dormant period.

Types of Winter Annual Weeds

The broadleaf weeds are classified into annuals and perennials. They can also be broken down into winter germinating and summer germinating weeds. Winter weeds germinate in the fall/winter, grow throughout that period and then die when the warm weather returns the following year.

These plants will produce flowers and seeds during that time, which will then germinate again next year. That is why applying a weed control application or two during the dormant-turf period will help to eliminate these weeds from your lawn.

Most broadleaf weed control products will take care of the majority of the winter annual weeds like Henbit, Large Hop Clover Poa Annua and Chickweed.

One good thing about warm-season grasses turning brown in the winter is that weed control applications from Spring-Green can be used on grassy weeds like annual bluegrass and Dallisgrass.  The grass you wish to control are often still green and growing while the desired grasses are dormant.

Controlling Winter Annual Weeds

Now is a good time to apply a pre-emergent weed control product to prevent many annual grasses from germinating. As the name implies, these products will control these problem weeds, like crabgrass, from germinating in the spring. Once the pre-emergent application is completed, it’s important to water the lawn at least half an inch to ensure it reaches the grass root growth, especially of there is no rain in the forecast.

Even though your yard may be brown during the winter, keep in mind this is completely normal during this time. There are a few tasks that you can still do to have a more weed-free lawn next year. If you have questions on winter annual weeds or lawn maintenance, contact your neighborhood lawn care professional at Spring-Green.

When Is The Best Time To Aerate Your Lawn?

beautiful home core aeration

The best time to aerate your lawn is based on 3 conditions:

  1. Type of grass in your lawn
  2. Weather conditions in your area
  3. Amount of moisture your lawn has received

Aeration can take place at any time of the year, but the best time is usually in the spring/early summer or fall. 

core aeration - what it looks like

The general recommendation is to core aerate when there is the most root growth. For warm-season grasses: Bermuda, St. Augustine, Centipede, Zoysia, it is in May and June when these grasses are coming out of dormancy. Cool-season grasses: bluegrass, ryegrass and the fescues, receive the most benefits when the lawn is aerated in the fall.

What would happen if you aerated a warm-season grass in the fall?

In most cases, nothing bad. The roots of the turfgrass will probably not grow any faster. But there is still the benefit of helping to reduce compaction. When a lawn is aerated, a certain amount of soil is lifted from the lawn and left back on the lawn.

As these cores are broken apart by mowing or melt into the lawn through rain fall or irrigation, the soil will intermingle with the current thatch layer and start feeding on it to naturally break it down.  The only concern would be if abnormally cold temperatures were to occur and the ground were to freeze. This may cause some roots to die that are close to the edge of the core holes.

spring-green tech core aerating a lawn

Fall may be the best time to aerate a cool-season lawn, but in some cases, aeration in spring and fall may also be recommended. If the thatch layer has been built up above a half of an inch over a period of time, spring and fall aeration may be the best choice. Many people like to seed after aeration, but we don’t recommend seeding a lawn in the spring, since we cannot apply a crabgrass preventer and the lawn will require more watering than it will in the fall.

The most important condition that can affect the quality of aerating a lawn is the amount of moisture that is in the soil. The lawn has to be moist for the tines to penetrate into the ground. Be sure to either wait until after a good rain fall or provide about a half inch of water to the lawn before trying to aerate it.

If you have not scheduled your lawn for a fall core aeration, especially if you are in the cool-season turf areas, contact your local Spring-Green office. It is one of the best things you can do to help ensure you have a healthy lawn.

Winter Weed Control in the South

While the northern parts of the US are in the process of hunkering down for the winter, the milder temperatures of the southern states are providing the ideal temperatures to control many troublesome weeds in what soon will be dormant lawns.

Even though these lawns may be dormant, many weeds are just starting to become active in the fall. These weeds are known as winter weeds. They can be annual, biennial or perennial in regards to life cycles, and these winter weeds can be very difficult to control.

winter weeds

The Different Types of Winter Weeds

The ones that are most troublesome are the winter broadleaf annual weeds, which include common chickweed, henbit, lawn burweed, large hop clover knawel and parsley-piert.

Winter annuals germinate in the fall, grow during the winter, and then develop flowers and set seeds in the spring and finally die when the weather turns hot during the summer. The seeds they leave behind will germinate in the following fall.

What Are Some Common Winter Weed Control Methods?

Most of these weeds can be treated with broadleaf weed control products, which are available at hardware stores, garden centers and home improvement centers. Lawn care companies like Spring-Green also offer programs that are designed to keep these weeds from becoming a major nuisance in your lawn. In many cases, these weeds distract from the uniform appearance of the lawn and will often overtake the desired grasses.

Winter weeds are probably the most annoying;, they are an annual bluegrass also known as poa annua . This annual weed has two periods of germination. The first period is in the late summer, usually in early September. The second is in late winter/early spring, usually late February to mid-March.

Winter weeds 2

Since annual bluegrass is in the grass family, broadleaf weed control products will not be effective. The product that is usually applied to control annual bluegrass is a pre-emergent weed control product.

Pre-emergent weed control inhibits the formation of a new plant from the seed the plant leaves behind. Annual bluegrass is a prolific seed producer. The same pre-emergent weed control product that is applied to control crabgrass will also control annual bluegrass.

Taking care of weeds during the winter on warm season turfgrasses will help to assure that the lawn will be more attractive in the spring. The best weed control method of all is a thick, well-fertilized lawn that is mowed high and receives adequate moisture during the growing season. However, you may find it easier to contact your local lawn care provider , such as Spring-Green, to help you care for your lawn.

The Best Time to Aerate Your Lawn, for Cool and Warm Season Grasses

core aerator used by a Spring-Green technician

September is here and the amount of sunlight is becoming less and less each day. Less sunlight means that the leaves on trees will start to show their fall colors, summer weeds will begin to slow down growing and another summer is coming to a close. Early fall lawn projects are on homeowners’ minds, and many are wondering if this is the best time to aerate their lawns.

Aerating Your Lawn in the Fall Works for Cool Season Grasses

For cool-season grasses, this is the time of year when the top growth slows down and the root growth increases. Fall is the time when these grasses naturally “repair” the damage that was caused by the stresses of summer. Heat and a lack of rain have taken their toll on cool-season lawns. Insect and disease outbreaks add to the damage level and have left many lawns in a sorry shape for the fall.

In my 37+ years in lawn care, I have always been amazed at the recuperative ability of turfgrasses to recover from these stresses. Even though they can come back, one of the most important things you can do to help a cool-season lawn recover is to core aerate to increase rooting and the overall health of the lawn. It is also a good idea to overseed the lawn to help it fill in even faster. By opening up the lawn, more air, water and nutrients can easily reach the root zone. The cores or plugs of soil that are left behind will breakdown and incorporate into the thatch layer. It is the microorganisms in the soil that feed and the thatch to lessen its impact on the lawn.

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When Is the Best Time to Aerate Warm Season Grasses?

For those of you that have warm-season grasses, the best time to aerate your lawn is in early summer. If you aerate the lawns right now, they won’t be harmed, but the benefits are much less.

When Is the Best Time to Add Nitrogen Fertilizer?

If you plan to apply an application of nitrogen to your warm-season lawn one more time this year, be sure to do so by the end of September. Stimulating new growth in October or November can be detrimental to the lawn if an early frost hits the area. Too much nitrogen in the fall can also lead to an increase in disease activity the following spring.

Before we know it, leaves are going to begin to fall. There are a number of fall lawn and landscape projects that are coming up as the year moves on. I will be discussing those in future blog posts. Enjoy the last of the summer warmth while you can.

Core aeration is just one of the services Spring-Green offers to help homeowners prepare their lawns for winter. Contact your local Spring-Green for a free estimate of your lawn’s unique needs.

When You Should Core Aerate and Reseed Your Lawn

soil plugs from core aeration

What Is Core Aeration?

You may have heard about core aeration from a local lawn care company or have read about the procedure in gardening publications. Simply put, core aeration is a process where a machine travels across a lawn or turfgrass area and removes and then deposits plugs of soil and thatch back onto the lawn. This process opens up the lawn to provide more air, water, and nutrients to the root system of the turf. This process will help to produce a healthier lawn. It is recommended that you leave the plugs of soil on the lawn so the soil that has been brought up will melt back into the lawn to help reduce thatch – the microorganisms in the soil will feed on the thatch and break it down. Now that we know what it is, when is the best time to core aerate your lawn?

When to Core Aerate Cool Season Grasses

The process works best when the root system of the plant is actively growing. For cool season grasses, the most root growth occurs in the fall, followed by the spring. Most core aeration for cool-season grasses takes place in the fall.

Spring-Green employee core aerating a lawn

When to Core Aerate Warm Season Grasses

For warm-season grasses, the best time to core aerate is in the early summer because the roots for these plants are most active during this time of year. Aerating warm season grasses in the fall will not provide the benefits of improving root growth since the turf is beginning to enter a dormant period and growth will stop.

After Aerating, Reseed the Lawn

Reseeding a lawn after it has been core aerated is advantageous for cool season grasses, but seeding does not perform as well for warm season grasses. The main reason for this is that the seed is difficult and can take a long time to germinate. For a seed to germinate, it needs to be kept moist during the germination process. If the roots dry out before the seed has been able to send the root into the soil, it will die. Most warm-season grasses’ reproductive systems (called stolons) grow very quickly and will fill in thin and bare areas quickly, so seeding is not as much of a concern.

Re-sodding Is Another Option

If there are larger areas that have died out due to winter kill or past insect or disease damage, placing new pieces of sod of the same turfgrass that is growing in the lawn will help to fill in these areas. The easiest way to do this is to unroll the piece of sod, and then use a spade to make vertical cuts around the perimeter of the sod. After doing so, remove the sod and, using the spade, make horizontal cuts at about an inch below grade. Remove the dead grass and some of the soil and place the new sod in the prepared area. Keep it watered and it will soon fill in the surrounding areas.

Contact your local Spring-Green professional to schedule a core aeration today and start to enjoy the benefits of a healthy lawn.

Lawn Diseases: Caring for Warm Season Grasses Like Centipede Grass

Lawn disease solutions for warm season grasses

I recently attended the South Carolina Landscape and Turfgrass Association annual conference and tradeshow in Columbia, SC for the second year now. Since I’ve lived most of my life in northern Illinois, I always welcome the chance to learn more about warm-season grasses, and this show provides some appreciated insight.

Warm Season Lawn Disease: Centipede Decline

One of the presentations I attended was about warm-season grass disease. Centipede grass is grown in many home lawns throughout the South and requires less fertilizer than many other warm-season grasses—it’s also prone to two diseases: Large Patch and Centipede Decline. The speaker, Dr. Bruce Martin from Clemson University, explained that Centipede Decline is considered a man-made disease, often brought on by homeowners who seem to follow the “if a little is good, a lot is better” school of thought on centipede grass care. Too much water, improper mowing and too much fertilizer will often lead to this lawn disease. It is more of a condition brought on by too much outside stimulus.

When speaking with our franchise owners in the southern states, they’ve told us that several homeowners have contacted them for help after they have tried and failed at caring for their own Centipede grass lawn. At that point, it is an uphill battle to get the lawn back into shape. Fortunately, our owners have the experience and knowledge to help improve these warm season grass lawns.

Warm Season Lawn Disease: Large Patch

Large Patch disease (formerly known as Brown Patch) occurs in the cooler weather of fall through early spring on warm-season grasses. It can infect Centipede, St. Augustine, Bermuda and Zoysia grasses. (Brown Patch, in contrast, occurs during the heat and humidity of summer and is often found on Tall Fescue lawns.) Large patch appears mostly in circular patches that are yellow to tan in color. They start off small—2 to 3 feet in diameter—but can quickly expand to 10 feet or more in diameter. The patches can grow together to form even larger patches, which is where it gets the name “Large Patch.”

To determine if Large Patch is happening on a lawn, you have to look for spots or lesions on the grass plants. It may be necessary to peel back the dead, older leaves to see the lesions. Disease-control materials are available to treat this lawn disease, but the treatments need to start in the fall when soil temperatures fall to about 70 degrees.

Not only were there sessions on warm-season grasses, but there were also sessions on tree care, such as caring for palm trees. South Carolina is known as the Palmetto State, named for the Sabal Palm that grows along the coast. The botanical name for the Sabal Palm is Sabal Palmetto, which is where it got its name. It is more commonly called the Cabbage Palm and can grow as high as 80 feet. One of the interesting things I learned about these trees is that the wood is soft and spongy, not dense like a regular deciduous tree. These trees were used to construct a fort during the Revolutionary War—the British became frustrated when their cannonballs would not penetrate the walls, but just bounced off… but I digress.

Spring-Green: Staying Up to Date on Lawn Care Research

Even though I have been working in lawn care for over 37 years, I always find that I can learn new information and enjoy attending these regional conferences. In addition to validating what I already know, I always learn new techniques and recommendations. There is a good deal of research on turfgrass being done at universities across the United States, and staying up to date on the latest information is a value to our franchise owners—especially in regards to the customers that they service.

Want to learn more about warm season grasses or other problems affecting your yard? Ask your local Spring-Green professional to come out for a free estimate!

Winter Weed Control on Warm-Season Grasses

With the colder weather hitting the states lately, we don’t need to be worrying about weeds, right? Wrong! Areas with warm season grasses, like Alabama, can still have a weed problem even when the turf goes dormant.

Except for parts of Florida, most warm season grasses enter into a dormant state during the winter. They will turn brown and not green-up until next spring through early summer. Even though the grass turns brown, there are still weeds that continue growing throughout the winter dormant period.

These broadleaf weeds are basically classified into annuals and perennials. They can also be broken down into winter germinating and summer germinating weeds. Some weeds germinate in the fall/winter, grow throughout that period and then die when the warm weather returns next year. Winter germinating weeds will produce flowers and seeds during that time, which will then germinate again next year. That’s why winter weed control on warm season grasses is so essential—applying a weed control application or two during the dormant-turf period will help to eliminate these weeds from your lawn.

Most broadleaf weed control products will take care of the majority of the winter germinating annual weeds like Henbit, Large Hop Clover and Chickweed. One good thing about warm season grasses turning brown in the winter is that a non-selective weed control product like Round-Up can be used on grassy weeds like annual bluegrass and Dallisgrass. Be sure the desired grasses are completely dormant, but that the grass you wish to control is still green and growing before using Round-Up.

Winter is also a good time to apply a pre-emergent weed control product to prevent many annual grasses from germinating. As the name implies, these products will control problem weeds, like crabgrass, from germinating.

Even though your yard may be brown during the winter, there are still a few tasks that you can do to have a more weed-free lawn next year. Talk to your local Spring-Green professional to find the right program for your lawn and budget!

Fertilizing Your Lawn in the Fall: Cool vs. Warm Season Grasses

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Is Fall a Good Time to Fertilize?

It all depends on what type of grass you have growing in your lawn.

If your lawn has warm-season grasses in it like Centipede, St. Augustine, Bermuda or Zoysia, you are at the latest possible time to fertilize your lawn. Many universities recommend that these grasses not be fertilized after the end of September since you don’t want to stimulate new, tender growth that could be damaged by frost. These warm-season grasses need to “harden off” or slowdown in growth as they begin to enter into their dormant period. If you still want to fertilize your lawn now, you could cause damage to your lawn that may not become apparent until next spring.

If your lawn has one of the cool-season grasses, like bluegrass, ryegrass, fine fescue or tall fescue, this is the best time of year to fertilize it. Fall is the time of most active root growth for these cool-season grasses. They need the food that the fertilizer provides to grow new roots. These grasses are better adapted to the cooler temperatures of fall and actually grow better at this time of year. In addition to lawn fertilization, fall is also a good time to core aerate your lawn as this process will help the roots grow better as well.

How Much Fertilizer Do I Need?

Depending on where you live, there may still be enough time to apply two applications of fertilizer this fall. You should space the applications apart by about 4 to 6 weeks. As far as the amount of fertilizer you should apply, generally speaking you should apply between three-quarters to one pound of nitrogen per 1,000 sq. ft. Determining how much fertilizer product you need to deliver requires the use of some mathematical equations.

The three numbers on a bag of fertilizer represent the percent by weight of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium that is in the bag. So, if the bag has an analysis of 28-0-3, the bag contains 28% nitrogen, 0% phosphorus and 4% potassium. If your goal is to provide three-quarters of a pound of nitrogen per 1,000 sq. ft., then divide .75 by .28, which equals 2.68 pounds of product applied per 1,000 sq. ft. If your lawn is 10,000 sq. ft. you will need about 27 pounds of product to supply three-quarters of a pound of nitrogen per 1,000 sq. ft.
Fall is rapidly approaching, which means that leaves will be falling soon and before we know it, we will be switching from lawn mowers to snow blowers. For this, I can wait.

If you hate math, leave fertilizer application to the pros. Get in touch with your local Spring-Green today!

Low-Maintenance Lawns: Choosing Between Centipede and Zoysia Grasses

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Homeowners in the South looking for a low-maintenance lawn are often deciding between Centipede and Zoysia —two warm season grasses native to Southeast Asia that take kindly to heat and humidity and need very little mowing because they grow very slowly or grow horizontally instead of vertically.

They have a lot in common, and are both grasses that create lawns that are easy to take care of, but there are also important differences.

Appearance

Zoysia gives you a green lawn in the spring. It has a look that is probably familiar if you’ve ever been golfing. Golf courses across the South like Zoysia for fairways and putting areas because the grass keeps its manicure, is attractive and, thanks to its heavy sod and deep roots, holds up nicely to traffic.

Growing Emerald Zoysia Grass – Warm Season Turf Tips

Centipede’s blades, meanwhile, are more yellowish green, and nice and short. Centipede has a wider blade that gives the lawn a more course texture than Zoysia. Centipede, despite its roots being relatively shallow, provides a nice, thick lawn turf that’s popular for park use. Centipede is also known as the “poor man’s grass,” because it usually only grows to five inches in height, and slowly at that.

Growing Centipede Grass – Warm Season Turf Tips

Watering

Both grasses are “drought resistant,” but Zoysia requires more water, even though its deeper roots make it a better grass for surviving extended dry conditions. When not watered well during drought conditions, Zoysia will survive but discolor and stop growing. Most homeowners only water their Centipede lawn on an as needed basis, when the grass starts turning brown. Once you water it, Centipede returns quickly, like magic, back to its normal vibrant color. (Centipede grass prefers deeper, less-frequent watering.)

Diseases, Weeds and Pests

Zoysia’s thicker sod helps it repel weeds year-round and also makes it less susceptible to disease and insect strain. All this reduces the need for herbicides, fungicides and insecticides to be applied in your yard, which is nice if you live near a water source or have young children at home.

Fertilizer, Erosion and Runoff

Depending on your local conditions, Zoysia requires light-to-moderate fertilization in the spring and summer. Centipede on the other hand, requires less or none—saving time, money and reducing the possibility of nutrient runoff and nonpoint water pollution of lakes and streams.

Complicating the runoff issue, however, is that Zoysia’s deep roots reduce both erosion and runoff. This can make it an ideal grass for yards with contour descending into bodies of water (like small ponds), even though it needs twice-annual fertilizations. The herbicides and insecticides required by Centipede grass will more readily travel to water sources, of which there are many in the coastal south.

Sun, Shade

Centipede is a great direct-sun grass with medium shade tolerance. Centipede could be a great choice for large open yards, and newer yards at the immature landscaping stage. Zoysia would be the better choice for properties with a nice complement of mature shade trees, while also doing fine in the open-sun parts of your lawn.

Frost

Is your home at altitude, or otherwise prone to the occasional frost? Zoysia wins some points here for cold adaptability. During a frost, Zoysia goes into dormancy. It turns and stays brown until the air temperature returns to 70 degrees. It copes. Centipede copes less well: With repeated dips below 32 degrees, it’s subject to winter kill, which would not end up being so “low-maintenance” after all, if you had to replace your lawn after a cold snap.

Salt

For homeowners in low-lying ocean and gulf coastal areas, Zoysia is the more salt-tolerant grass.

Wear, Tear and Traffic

Zoysia, again thanks to its deep roots, holds up better and, if damaged, recovers faster than Centipede.

Establishing

Making the switch from your current grass to Centipede or Zoysia takes effort and patience.

Zoysia: For replacing cool-season grass, use Zoysia plugs. It can take two years for Zoysia to become the dominant grass in your yard—and it will stop advancing on your old grass during extended dry periods. Do not attempt to insert Zoysia plugs into an existing warm-season grass like Bermuda. The existing grass will have to be removed first. Starting with bare ground Zoysia seeds work better than plugs, and usually take five months to establish. Once it’s in, Zoysia is very difficult to remove—as equally hard to remove as Bermuda grass.

Centipede: To overseed your existing lawn with Centipede, mow it down low in the late spring, core aerate the lawn, then broadcast the seed. If you don’t core aerate first, then rake well after you broadcast the seed because Centipede seeds need to be covered by dirt in order to germinate. After 30 days, your lawn will start to thicken and gradually transform into a Centipede lawn. This usually takes a full three months from the day you seed. If you’re starting with tilled earth—especially recommended if you had Bermuda grass in place—then seed the bare ground sometime between April and July, rake (to help seeds eventually find a spot under the dirt), then apply fertilizer (it helps at first) and mow regularly through the summer. Centipede seeds take 30 days to germinate, so be patient. You will not see any grass inside the first four weeks after seeding. After three months—by fall—you will have a new low maintenance lawn.

No matter which type of grass you decide on, to establish it across a sprawling multi-acre property, we recommend contracting with hydroseeding company, because it becomes a job beyond the normal scope of what a homeowner can accomplish on their own.

Good luck!

Any questions? Contact your local Spring-Green lawn care professional for advice. We’re happy to help you plan or install your new low maintenance lawn.